All posts by Team Unbreakable

100 Who Care features Team UNBREAKABLE

Board member Robert Bracey of Quartet Service and his wife Anita Stefan sponsored a group of Team UNBREAKABLE members at a recent 100 Who Care evening to present the case for $10,000 funding for Team UNBREAKABLE. A great opportunity and the chance to fund an additional 3 schools.

As always, three charities were randomly selected to pitch: Toronto Friends Supporting Refugees, Feed It Forward and Team Unbreakable.  While Team UNBREAKABLE wasn’t selected at this event, we did present and raised interest in the Team UNBREAKABLE Program.

Thanks Rob!

 

School-wide fundraiser run at Parkdale JR & SR Public School

On Tuesday, June 5th Parkdale JR & SR Public School held a school-wide fundraiser run to help send its Team Unbreakable Group to the Toronto Unbreakable 5k. It’s at this event on June 9th that the run group participants will take on their goal of completing a 5k run/walk. The entire school participated in the fundraiser raising $1084 from donations and bake sale.

Pictured above (from l to r) Nils Blondon (Team Unbreakable Program Coordinator), Carl Worrell ( Team Unbreakable Executive Director), Said Khayat (Parkdale Team Unbreakable co-lead) and Stephanie Hawkland (Parkdale Team Unbreakable co-lead).

To participate or learn more about the Toronto Unbreakable 5k and other Unbreakable events go to www.unbreakable5k.ca 

Join or sponsor our Team Unbreakable runners at the Mississauga Marathon May 1

Once again Team Unbreakable runners will be wearing their colours proudly at the Mississauga Marathon, Half Marathon,10K and 5K events on April 30 and May 1, 2016.

If you are interested in participating in one of the Mississauga events please consider joining our team and help us fundraise for Team Unbreakable Running Programs for youth mental health. If we have over 10 participants raising the most money per participant, we are eligible for a special Scotiabank Charity Challenge award. If you love what CameronHelps and Team Unbreakable is contributing to help our youth programs, please sponsor one of our runners. Here’s the link to register:

Runforteamunbreakable.ca and here’s the link to donate Donatetocameronhelps.ca

“Please join me on my 12th marathon to help make a difference in the lives of our youth,” says CameronHelps founder, David Harris. “You don’t have to run a full marathon to participate. There are races at every level, from 5K, 10K and the half-marathon.”

If you are joining the team, contact John Knox, our program director at CameronHelps (johnk@cameronhelps.ca) and he will answer your questions and even provide training tips! All you have to do is (a) register on the main site as runner, (b) create your personal fundraising web page, (c) and click on the box to say you are fundraising on behalf of CameronHelps. If you raise over $150, your registration fee will be refunded and you’ll get a team shirt to wear for the race.

This fundraising program allows participants to personalize their own fundraising page with a fundraising goal, pictures and videos, send emails to friends and family asking for their support, build a fundraising team and enter offline donations. Participants can also share their personalized fundraising page with social media websites such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc.

“The assistance of Scotiabank allows us to provide our charity partners with 100% of all donations. We are very excited to be part of this fundraising through the continued success of the 2016 Mississauga Marathon Scotiabank Charity Challenge,” says David.

The 13th annual Mississauga Marathon will take place on Saturday, April 30th Sunday, May 1 2016 and offers “A Run For Everyone.” A Runner’s Expo is also part of Race Weekend, a mandatory stop for all participants to pick up their race kits taking place on Friday, April 29th and Saturday, April 30th, at the Port Credit Memorial Arena, in downtown Port Credit.

Bell Let’s Talk Day January 27: Join the growing conversation and support Canada’s mental health

National spokesperson Clara Hughes and the Bell Let’s Talk team today invite everyone to help end the stigma around mental illness while driving Bell’s donations to Canadian mental health on Bell Let’s Talk Day January 27.

Join in the conversation and drive mental health funding Joining the mental health conversation on Bell Let’s Talk Day not only supports those who struggle with a mental illness, you also drive Bell’s funding just by participating at no extra cost to you. For every text message, wireless and long distance call made by Bell Canada and Bell Aliant customers, every tweet using #BellLetsTalk, and every Facebook share of the Bell Let’s Talk Day image atFacebook.com/BellLetsTalk Bell will donate 5 cents more to Canadian mental health programs.

“We turn up the mental health volume on Bell Let’s Talk Day, letting all those who struggle know they have our support and can reach out for help without fear. At the same time, Bell increases its funding of Canadian mental health programs with each message of support you send,” said Clara Hughes, Canada’s 6-time Olympic medalist and national Bell Let’s Talk spokesperson since its launch in 2010. “I am so excited to be part of the incredible journey to making Canada a nation free of the stigma around mental illness. As we begin the next 5 years of our mental health initiative, I invite you to join me on January 27 to take the conversation further than ever before!”

“Over the past 5 years, Bell Let‘s Talk has made significant progress in increasing awareness and improving attitudes about mental health while also supporting significant new Canadian initiatives in care and access, research and workplace mental health,” said George Cope, President and CEO of BCE Inc. and Bell Canada.

A 2015 Nielsen survey undertaken on behalf of Bell Let’s Talk found that 81% of Canadians were more aware of mental health issues than in 2010 (87% of youth aged 18 to 24), 70% think attitudes about mental health have changed for the better (79% of young people), and 57% believe the stigma around mental illness has been reduced (65% of young people).

The 2016 Bell Let’s Talk team Joining Clara again this year on the Bell Let’s Talk team are TSN host Michael Landsberg, comedian Howie Mandel, entertainer Mary Walsh, and Québec personalities Stefie Shock and Michel Mpambara. New to the Bell Let’s Talk team for 2016 are singer-songwriter Serena Ryder, actor Marie-Soleil Dion and CFL player Étienne Boulay.

Bell Let’s Talk ambassadors professional golfer Andrew Jensen, comedian and writer Kevin Breel, CFL veteran Shea Emry, and musician Robb Nash once again join the team in sharing their own mental health stories and welcoming Canadians to the conversation. This year we also welcome two more new voices to the Bell Let’s Talk team, Toronto Maple Leafs Head Coach Mike Babcock and singer-songwriter Séan McCann.

Sirens of Shanti raises $300 for CameronHelps with launch of its new music video

The diverse music talents of Producer Tony Singh were on display Dec. 16 at Lula Lounge in Toronto, with the launch of his band’s new music video.

While showcasing the video “My Room” and its “global groove,” the band was able to raise $300 from audience donations for CameronHelps, thanks to its special relationship with the charity.

Sirens of Shanti is an eclectic and energetic music project by Tony (formerly of the Juno-nominated Punjabi by Nature). The project was spurred by what Tony felt was a void in the music industry. The music can be described a blend of complex ragas and rhythms from various parts of Southeast Asia, the Middle East and the Caribbean, set to some heavy dance – sometimes industrial – beats.

“What a fantastic night out! The premier of My Room with Tony Singh and Sirens of Shanti is a delight. The video is a visual feast and I will be telling all my friends about it. The live set by Tony Singh and Sirens of Shanti is amazing and you couldn’t help, but get up and dance during it,” said fan Brandy Broderick.

Video Producer, Valerie Pospodinis was over joyed by the response of the audience and looking forward to the next music video production in early 2016.

The night ended with Jason DJ Shine Spanu mixing music while guests danced, mingled and celebrated the holiday season.

Social Worker Scott Grant raises $600 for charity in his physical health for mental health journey

Back in the summer, Scott Grant approached CameronHelps to say he would be raising money for our charity.  His mission was to raise money by attempting to run a half-marathon and gain sponsors. As the story unfolded (through his blog writings), the path changed, but the overall goal remained the same.  We caught up with Scott recently and asked him to explain.

Q: What set you out on this journey?

While completing my Masters, I experienced an episode of psychosis that eroded at my ability to manage happiness and contentment in my life. In retrospect, the therapist had now become the client; I was sitting on the other side of the “couch.”

In connecting with my former self was the familiar question I had asked clients hundreds of times “what were you doing when things were going better than they are now.”  A cardinal activity I was practicing when my mental health was better was exercise.

Q: Why the CameronHelps connection?

This is where my connection to Cameron Helps begins. I was directed to the organization through a professional contact and I saw an organization facilitating a form of recovery that touched me personally.  I decided I would welcome my family, friends and professionally colleagues through a blog I titled “Running from Pills, Pathology and Pizza.”

Q: What was your goal?

As a social worker and activist, I was aware of the devolution of support for mental health services. I decided to raise money as I wrote my blog to work to support CameronHelps in their incredible work with youth. My goal was to train and run a half-marathon and report on my mental health and training to the readers of my blog.

Q: What did you learn from your experience?

There is a part of me that is very critical in the fact that I did not end up running the half-marathon. As I completed my training, I realize that long distance running is not something I enjoy. In August, I turned my attention to Crossfit and on a sweltering summer morning, I ran, skipped, rowed and pressed my way through my first workout. As I lay on the floor unsure if I was going to be sick, I smiled and realized that I had found my own form of medication. Since starting Crossfit, I have reduced some of my medication and have personally enjoyed the privilege of vitality.

Social Worker Scott Grant raises $600 for charity in his physical health for mental health journey

Back in the summer, Scott Grant approached CameronHelps to say he would be raising money for our charity.  His mission was to raise money by attempting to run a half-marathon and gain sponsors. As the story unfolded (through his blog writings), the path changed, but the overall goal remained the same.  We caught up with Scott recently and asked him to explain.

Q: What set you out on this journey?

While completing my Masters, I experienced an episode of psychosis that eroded at my ability to manage happiness and contentment in my life. In retrospect, the therapist had now become the client; I was sitting on the other side of the “couch.”

In connecting with my former self was the familiar question I had asked clients hundreds of times “what were you doing when things were going better than they are now.”  A cardinal activity I was practicing when my mental health was better was exercise.

Q: Why the CameronHelps connection?

This is where my connection to Cameron Helps begins. I was directed to the organization through a professional contact and I saw an organization facilitating a form of recovery that touched me personally.  I decided I would welcome my family, friends and professionally colleagues through a blog I titled “Running from Pills, Pathology and Pizza.”

Q: What was your goal?

As a social worker and activist, I was aware of the devolution of support for mental health services. I decided to raise money as I wrote my blog to work to support CameronHelps in their incredible work with youth. My goal was to train and run a half-marathon and report on my mental health and training to the readers of my blog.

Q: What did you learn from your experience?

There is a part of me that is very critical in the fact that I did not end up running the half-marathon. As I completed my training, I realize that long distance running is not something I enjoy. In August, I turned my attention to Crossfit and on a sweltering summer morning, I ran, skipped, rowed and pressed my way through my first workout. As I lay on the floor unsure if I was going to be sick, I smiled and realized that I had found my own form of medication. Since starting Crossfit, I have reduced some of my medication and have personally enjoyed the privilege of vitality.